No blame yet for Phillip Island safety car bedlam

No blame yet for Phillip Island safety car bedlam

A V8 supercar driver who speeds in pit lane invariably cops an attention-getting fine. A team that allows a dangerous release after a pit stop is penalised.


So far no official or officials has been blamed for the frightening safety car fiasco at Phillip Island on Sunday.

Either procedures or a communications blunder from the control tower was to blame for a crazy scenario which left the safety car stationary near the merge line on the main straight, confusing those drivers exiting the pits, while others on the track approached rapidly at speeds of 240-250kmh.

Drivers have it instilled in them that they cannot overtake a safety car unless waved through, but some sensed the danger and moved by.

Alarmed drivers later called for a review of procedures and an investigation (but not a witch-hunt) into how it happened.

Only quick reactions and masses of luck prevented an almighty shunt when the approaching cars crested the brow on the straight o find other cars either stopped or moving slowly.

"It was an absolutely dangerous situation and we were quite lucky that someone's fuel tank didn't end up under the bonnet with what happened," said former champion Rick Kelly.

What do you reckon? Should paid officials be liable for fines and suspensions in the same way drivers and teams are?

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